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to wander around the audience. she gave list of speech and somebody asked she would send her son to bosnia to bolster the foreign policy positions and took a first of may and you could almost see their regret to that her and bob dole never had a child she said i cannot answer but the next day the media's said she is not ready for the campaign trail because she's not talking like a candidate but all the seven within three weeks the campaign had folded. i think michael dukakis problem with presidential debates what he would do if his wife was raped to give zero oil answer of defense of his opposition to capital punishment lycee does he have a human side? we see into the capabilities and without gore because of his cereal exaggerated. anyone of the stories but then we have them it important to become the internet from legislation. so he has leaked out of -- link them together and that helped in the long run. >> host: and then why did the mistakes of president clinton or george w. bush bush, why are those not fatal mistakes? request else's going on? there is a comment made about but do have a
bridge in bosnia herzegovina. the thing was built in the early 16th century. the bridge you're seeing is not the original. it stood for 427 year, stood through world war i, through world war ii, but in 1993, destroyed in the croat/bosnia war. gunshots, you can see the town was torn apart, including this bridge, but they rebuilt it and's in 2004 it was reopened. huge his tore irk many significance in that city, because as a rite of passage, young men jump off this bridge. it's a tradition. in 1968 they create add formal competition for these divers, but check them out. >> oh, wow! i'm assuming the water is deep? >> it is deep, very cold. you can see how beautiful the re-creation of the bridge is and how beautiful this competition is, and the city around it, to withstand all this turmoil. >> this isn't your normal, like, guys jumping off the bridge with gopro cameras. these are olympic-style divers. >> nor is it your typical rite of passage ceremony either. >> i thought it was pretty. the city and what it's been through in it's history. >>> it's the men of journalism calendar. >> photos
the region apart. we went to war twice in the balkans in bosnia and kosovo to prevent a split along religious lines. the middle east is far more important and far more dangerous in the balkans. we need to watch this. finally, on al qaeda -- for various legal and political and domestic reasons and diplomatic reasons, we see this as a war but we have not done a good job explaining to the american people the implications of that. if it is a war, why do we put these people on trial? this is a complex issue that is now crystallized in the criticism of the drones. we don't want to have a lack of clarity about our goals and our tools lead to a situation where we are afraid to go after these people because we don't think we have enough legitimacy, we don't think we have enough support from the american people. throughout the broader middle east in the areas where there is not effective government control, al-qaeda or groups elected to them pop up and they are a threat to the stability of the region and us and they need to be kept under the highest pressure. i will stop there, thank you very much. [ap
of a speech, and she was asked a question about whether she would send her son to bosnia. she was going to bosnia weeks later to boost the foreign policy mission. she took it as a personal question and could see the regret that they never had a child. she said, well, we never had children. i couldn't answer. it was an abstract question. the next day, the media said she's not ready for the trail because she's not talking like a candidate, but in a personal way, and all the sudden, three weeks, her came pain folded. i think michael's problem in terms of presidential debates asked about whether what he would do whether his wife was rained, and he gave a lawyerly answer, defense of the opposition to capital punishment, and we said, you know, does the guy have a human side at all? i think it's those things we see into the capabilities, into the character of the individual. i think al gore was hurt over the years, not because of one event, but because of his, kind of, pointed out as a serial exaggerator. any one of those stories -- explain a way, you know, never said he invented the internet,
thing going forward? >> syrians have begun to compare this situation to that of bosnia, the inch-community intervening. and i think it was more about shamed into a situation. and the population of 5 million when you had 200,000 being ethnically cleansed, that is with the international community to put into a very difficult situation and had to intervene. you have a civilian population and you have a regime that is waging a full-scale war. it's fully armed. you have a population that is trying to defend itself with small arms and increasingly bigger arms because as the soldiers, some of the preventive some of the free syrian army. and some of them actually confided in us that perhaps the don't even need to be armed. the arms supply is coming from within as people defect from the army, so that is a security threat, not just for countries, but the civilian population that is becoming increasingly caught between two sides. and now the free syrian army is no longer doing the defense job because, as i said earlier, now they want to create some sort of a strategic plan in which they cut
this in the book. there was one moment i was in bosnia and in a shelter in a refugee camp and i was with one man whose own family had suffered tremendously. i was in the shoulder with him and he said to me i appreciate the fact that you are here. don't get me wrong. i appreciate that there is a shelter for my family and appreciate the fact my kids can go to kindergarten and there is food here but he said if people really cared about us they would be willing to protect us. i didn't know what to say to him at the time. i was only 20 years old but i remember reflecting on that later and realizing what he said was true. if there's anything in our life we really do love, really care about we are willing to respond with care and compassion. but the things we care about in our lives and the things we love we are also willing to act with courage, we are willing to protect people and willing to love them in that way. i started to think about what it meant to care about something and live a life with compassion and courage and i became convinced during my time in bosnia and rwanda that there were times wh
rule of law development. we look at his experience in bosnia where he was greatly exposed to the intelligence community and special operations command after the mission switched from hunting were chairs to hunting terrorists. he helped to spearhead this. he was with the green berets and the special ops community. the rangers and delta force, the first time those two communities have the same mission. this is important as his future commander in iraq. but he was out there in a baseball cap and after the guys who go in and knock on the doors, he went and delivered letters and in his oral history interview, which i conducted with michael hammond from the brookings institute, this is a transformational. not for him. working on a comprehensive plan with inter agency, joint command, everything. all of these players in his first time to really run in this kind of operational command. so we look at all of these experiences. we try to show how some of it plays out in iraq. i felt that those experiences were pretty well covered for him. a great book. but the real story is how all th
of it was -- and i write about this in the book, you know, there was one moment when i was in bosnia, and i was actually in a shelter in a refugee camp, and i was with one man who had, who had his own family had suffered tremendously. and i was in the shelter with him, and i remember he said to me, he said, you know, i appreciate the fact that you're here, he said, don't get me wrong. he said i appreciate the fact that there's a shelter here for my family, i appreciate the fact that my kids can go to a kindergarten, and i'm glad there's food here, but he said if people really cared about us, they'd be willing to protect us. and i didn't know what to say to him at the time. i was only 20 years old. but i remember reflects on that later and realizing that what he said was true, that if there's anything in our life that we really do love, that we really do care about, that we're willing to respond to it of course with care and with compassion, but it's also the case of the things that we care about in our lives, the things that we love that we're always willing to act with courage, and we're w
work in cambodia, bosnia and rwanda. he says his religion has motivated him. >> i think there are a couple of key lessons that come from judaism that shaped my life. one of them is the idea we have a duty to repair the world and all of us should play a role in our lives in trying to repair the world and to make the world better for the next generation. >> the world appears to be a better place for many of the vets who have gone through the mission continues. a study by the center for social development at washington university in st. louis found that over 70% of fellows have furthered their education and 80% have found civilian employment. >> delta class, atten-hut! we are fellows of the mission continues. >> we are fellows of the mission continues! >> these folks have already once signed on the dotted line and said that they are willing and able and ready to serve. we're just saying, "serve again." >> the mission continues has now graduated over 500 fellows and plans to recruit far more of the 5 million who have served in the last ten years. for "religion and ethics new
clinton said in 95 or so we will go into bosnia for one year. the german cabinet just decided this week to withdraw our last soldiers from bosnia. some people don't even remember why we are there it's been so long. but it took more than a decade to get even this little problem right in to this day we haven't gotten it right. bosnia still not in good shape. a huge civilian effort required will need to go on and on for any number of years. cemex was in the room will notice much better than i do. so that is very important that we understand and draw the consequences to be clear from this analysis that militarily we can actually confront most of the challenges we have had to face. our problem is to have the political will and the instrument, the tools of development, the nonmilitary nationbuilding, quote, unquote, whatever that means. and that has been lacking very often in all these cases. >> let's take some more comments and questions back here. >> hike in the stephen flynn from northeastern university in boston. on the issue of new normal, i wonder picking up on david's point about the p
. >> his favorite approach e to b bosnia, arm the rebels. his favorite approach to iraq, we should arm the rebels. his favorite approach to libya, we should arm the rebels. his favorite approach to syria was, arm the rebels. that just works everywhere. i understand the republican party needs somebody to tell them what to do. needs somebody to tell them what direction to point in when it comes to foreign policy. but they haven't figured out if iraq was a bad idea. if that was a bad idea, how did that happen in your own party? in this last election, the republican party tried to just punt on the issue of foreign policy. by the time of that third debate, it was more like a forfeit, okay, you win, we don't want to talk about it. but you don't get to decide when you want to learn about it or talk about it. the policy committee is in congress that makes decision about foreign policy this v to make decision about foreign policy. the senate has to confirm somebody as secretary of state, even if john mccain decides he doesn't want one this year. there's a basic level of competence required, eve
of the hitler policies in germany. >> george carver, born into slavery, not a chemist specializing in bosnia, first introduced me to the mysteries of plant fertilization. spent a good many years breeding corn because the scientist deepen my appreciation of plants in a way i could never forget. superior ability is not exclusive possession of any one race or any one class, provided and are given the right opportunity. >> democratic party bosses mistrust his devotion to principle over politics. it looked like the wallace nomination would go up in flames when roosevelt, angry and frustrated, wrote a remarkable letter to the delegates in which he flatly turned down the presidential nomination. >> the democratic party has failed when it has fallen to the control of those who think in terms of dollars instead of human values. until the democratic party shakes off all the shackles of control fasten upon by the forces of conservatism, reaction and appeasement, it will not continue its march to victory. the party cannot face in both directions at the same time. therefore, i declined the honor of the n
tear the region apart. we went there twice in the balcans in boas knee -- bosnia and kosovo to resist such a split. the middle east is far more important and far more dangerous than the balkans. we have to watch this. on al-qaeda, for various legal reasons as well as political domestic reasons and diplomatic reasons, we see it as a war, but we've not done a good job explaning to the american people the implications of that. if it's a war, why then do we put people on trial? there's answers to that. there's illegal enemy combat tents, but it's a complex issue crystallized in the criticism of the drones. we don't want to have a lack of clarity about our goals and our tools lead to a situation as seen before 9/11 where we are afraid to go after these people because we don't think we have enough legitimacy, we don't think we have enough support from the american people. right now, throughout the broader middle east and all of the areas where there's not effective government control from the mali, somalia, that area's doing better, to yemen, other places, al-qaeda, or al-qaeda linked group
criminals in bosnia, three combat tours in iraq. he took over in afghanistan at a very difficult time and he's lead the cia with a fairly defendant hand. so i think in the long run his legacy will be one that americans will remember with fondness. >> suarez: greg miller, is this a tough time for the cito lse its chief under any circumstances given the continuing questions about events in benghazi? >> yeah. and that has already led to a lot of speculation on the timing of this depar ture by the director. i mean it's coming just a couple of days after the election. there are questions about whether, you know, whether the administration knew this was coming. white house officials insist that was not the case and that president obama was stunned when petraeus came to him and made clear his intent to resn. >> suarez: how is the cia changed under his leadership? >> well, you know, at 14 months he has been there less time than all but a few other directors. and so i would say a couple things. i mean he has presided over a significant expansion of the drone campaign in yemin, broadening the cia's dr
million. god has done t we started 20 years ago with a few thousand boxes going to the children of bosnia. and god has done it. this is a christmas program. of course, we are collecting the boxes this week as our national collection week, and the boxes are being packed by families and then we ask people to put toy necessary a box. >> you brought one along. this is a girl's box obviously? >> this is a girl's box and it has girls things in it. it has a stuffed animal, doll. >> hair band. >> hair band, toys. but there's school supplies in the bottom. >> even a bar of soap. and there's a washcloth, socks. it's unbelievable. >> most these kids have never had a gift in their life. there for yourself and saw it. we want them to know that god loves them of this is christmas. >> absolutely fabulous. 9 million boxes. this is your big chance to be a part of it. pack a box or more than one. and this is a picture of me. you can pack a docks box and ship it off. where do they ship it off to? >> go to the website and then they can go to operation christmas child, and the drop off-site is where they live
, there was one moment when i was in bosnia and i was actually in a shelter in a refugee camp. and i was with one man whose own family had suffered tremendously. i remember he said to me that i appreciate the fact that you are here. do not get me wrong. i appreciate the fact that there is a shelter here for my family and my kids can go to kindergarten and i am glad there is food here, but if people really cared about us, they would be willing to protect us. i have no idea what to say to him at the time. but i remember reflecting on that later and realizing that what he said was true. but if there is anything in our lives that we really do love and care about, that we are willing to respond with care and compassion. it is also the case that the things that we care about and love, we are also willing to act with courage and protect people and love them in that way. so i started to think about what it meant to really care about something and live a life of compassion and courage. i became convinced that there were times when people needed to step forward and use that strength to protect other people
,000. bosnia. catholic priests and muslim imams face off in a charity soccer match. religious leaders for both groups came up with the idea after local authorities said the city needed money for a new kindergarten. thousands of fans bought tickets to the match and cheered whoever scored. the priests won a to 3. and that's a wrap on this fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. >> a retired british royal air force pilot reportedly crashed a replica world war i era bi plane in colorado. local reports indicate the plane went down near a small airport east of denver killing the pilot who was the only person on board. the plane was a replica of the kind you see here. airport official says the pilot, who was in his 70s, shipped parts of the plane from london and assembled it himself. no word yet on what caused that crash. with his hit recordings and unmistakable style, jimmy hendrix became a music legend during his short lifetime. and now one of rock and roll's greatest guitarists is back with more. coming up, details on the hendrix licks you never heard. green bean casserole. you'll find the recipe
team in the bosnia peace settlement, and was a recipient of the robert s. frazier award for peace negotiations for his work on the kosovo crisis. prior to joining the foreign service, ambassador hill served as peace corps volunteer in cameroon. he graduated with a ba in economics, received a masters degree from the naval war college in 1994. ladies and gentle and i would just like to take a moment to recognize these gentlemen for all the work they have done for the united states in asia and around the world. so if we could just give them a round of applause. [applause] >> we are going to have a little bit of the conversation about different issues in asia, and i will start with a few questions. will then go to the audience later on in the hour to entertain your questions as well. so gentlemen, the first question i'd like to start with is a question about asia as a strategic priority. and the question i would ask is, as assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs, each of you were among our country's highest-ranking policymakers on issue. and so in retrospect, i
into bosnia for one year the german cabinet just decided this week to withdraw our last soldiers from bosnia. you know, some people don't even remember why we're there it is been so long. but it took more than a decade to get even this slow progress. and we have not gotten it right. it's still not in good shape. still a huge civilian effort required which will need to go on and on and on for any number of years. some experts in the room will know this much better than i do. i think that is very important that we understand. the consequences from this analysis that militarily we can actually control most of the challenges that we have had to face. our problem is to have the political will and the instruments, the tools of development, of nonmilitary nation-building, whatever that means, and that has been lacking in all of these cases. >> listed some questions back here. >> steven from northeastern university. on the issue of new normal i wonder picking up on the point about the price tag in part just the sort of coming to grips with the universe that we could present to the upper band to make
development and it continues. we went to war twice in the bosnian -- in the balkans in bosnia and kosovo to prevent such a split along religious lines in the balkans and the middle east it is far more important and far more dangerous than the balkans. so we need to watch this. finally, on al qaeda for various legal reasons as well as politically and domestic reasons and diplomatic reasons we see this as a war. but we haven't done a good job recently explaining to the american people the implications of that. if it is a war y then do we put these people on trial? there are answers to that as the legal enemy combatants. but the this is a complex issue that is crystallized in the criticism of the drones. we don't want to do is have a lack of clarity about our goals and our tools to lead to a situation as we saw before 9/11 that we were afraid to go after these people because we don't think that we have enough legitimacy, we don't think that we have enough support from the american people. right now, as well as the middle east and all of the areas where there isn't effective government contr
which was a nation-building exercise. look at his experience in bosnia where he was greatly exposed to the intelligence community. after the motions which from one of hunting for criminals to hunting terrorists. he was there when 9/11 happened and they stood up a joint interagency counterterrorism task force and he helped to spearheaded. he would go out on these night raids with the green berets and the special ops community. the rangers and delta force guys as well as the special forces. this is the first time they had the first mission and this was important for his development as a future commander in iraq and understand how to use those teams. he was out there in a baseball cap after the guys guest: would go a guest: host: in and not on the door, he fancied himself a negotiator and would deliver letters for the workers to turn themselves in. we do not go into that into too much depth. his oral history interview which i conducted with someone from the brookings institute, this was a transitional period for him. i am working with special mission units but working on the multi-year
out. i will never ever voted democrat again. that bosnia, i can't believe it was swept under the table. >> are you talking about that gussy it? -- are you talking about been gauzy? >> yes. seems like everything obama says is a lie. i voted for him last time and i made a grave mistake. >> when was it you made that change to mitt romney? when did you decide to vote for mayor romney? >> i would have voted for anybody but i think he is an honest, bright, a decent person and a businessman. >> this is just north of richmond, the second of three stops. president obama also has three stops today. he has las vegas later this afternoon and we will wrap up at the university of colorado at 9:00 tonight. go ahead. >> i am supporting president obama. i think people don't understand halt -- people to understand all he has done as president. he has had to do a lot in the house because the republicans, they try to stop a lot of the things he tries to pass. he says he is going to come out with the health care and he has and a lot of the things he says he is going to do, he does. there aren't democrats i
the team in the boss bosnia peace settlement and was a recipient for the work on the crisis. prior to joining the form service ambassador hill serve as a peace corp. volunteer. he graduated from college with a ba in economics and received a master degree from the navel war college in 1994. ladies and gentlemen, i would like to take a moment to recognize these gentlemen for the work they have done for the united states in asia and around the world. if we could give them a round of applause. [applause] >> so we're going have a little bit of conversation about different issues in asia, and start with a few questions. we will then go to the audience later on in the hour to entertain your questions as well. so gentleman, the first question i would like to start we is a question about asia as strategic priority. and the question i would ask you is as a assistant secretary of state for east asia and pacific affairs, each of you were among our country's highest ranking policy makers on asia. and so in retrospect, i would ask what what was your biggest challenge aside from the brutal travel
our soldiers from bosnia. some people do not even remember why our soldiers are there it has been so long. it took more than a decade to get even this little problem right, and we still have not to this day gotten it right. bosnia is still not in good shape. a huge civilian effort is required and it will need to go on for years and years. i am sure there are experts in the room that know more about this than i do. understand the broad consequences. militarily, we can confront most of the challenges that we have had to face. our problem is to have the political will and the instruments, the tools of development, of non-military nation-building, whatever that means in detail, and that has been lacking very often in these cases. >> we will take some more comments and questions. >> on the issue of new normal, picking up on david's point about the price tag post 9/11, is that in part of coming to grips with the hubris that we could prevent all sorts of bad things from happening, that we could stop risk? coping with it is what we really need to do and maybe bring it very close to home. we
for anyone. during the famine use the how one child can live and what can die. in palestine dollar bosnia february thoughtful for journalists to stay objective and somebody else not changing it. when i put to my story on nbc it could be too long have can you tell the story? somewhere that we have to take as reporters we struggled to convince editors. talk about women and the glass ceiling is important those who work in the field for so long they become the editor so it is not how many acres you have but once you have the woman in the newsroom makes the decision and then head of a chart is the real measurement to make sure there is another crack in a glass ceiling. [applause] >> for us of our story we just have to move five and make a story. i do with the zero leaders. and then put to into prison. i was pressured to death that the trial did not take place yet to. the reviews to file through to go to the backroom of the hotel later on midday somebody from the algerian government called the editor in london to talk of the ability. later i saw the story this to was taken away. they get angry
and bosnia to prevent such a split along religious lines the middle east is far more important and dangerous so we need to watch misheard. for herb diplomatidiplomati c reasons we see this we have not done a good job to explain the implications. why do we put the people on trial? is a complex issue and the criticism of the drums we don't want to have a lack of clarity lead to a situation that we are afraid to go after these people we don't think we have enough support from and american people. in those areas to there's not enough government control two yen with other places, al qaeda groups pop-up they are a threat to us in the to be kept under the highest pressure. i will stop there. they get very much. [applause] >> imagine a courageous national-security staff member riding a memo to the president outlined the policies for the second term. or maybe not the job was already lined up outside government. he may offer the following remarks. first, for less than theirs you take. one. as much as we would like to wish it away moving to a share with the real bandwidth based on our preference. we ca
-old this afternoon. he's an american citizen from bosnia. prosecutors are asking he spend the rest of his life behind bars. the botched plot was one of the closest calls since the september 11 attacks. >>> they've been plagued with problems for years. now a f-22 raptor crashed in the florida panhandle. the pilot ejected safely. no one on the ground was hurt. it's not yet known why it went down. the $190 million raptors were grounded for four months last year over concerns the pilots were being deprived of oxygen when inside. >>> liberals tried to adown chick-fil-a and now targeting papa john's. it could backfire because it's national papa john's appreciation day. thousands are pledge to go eat there to support ceo. he's been under fire for saying that obamacare could force him to lay off workers. one franchise owner said the same thing right here on "fox & friends." >> 100 jobs this year with the new pizza restaurants and even grocery stores and there is just no money for it. i cannot pay my staff and pay all these taxes. >> gretchen: ceo of papa john's has said obamacare will force him to charge ten
you deal with that? that is not true. we were in bosnia. we have 2000 mosques. and nothing this is very effective. a much better approach is an approach which combines the kind of things we do with exchange programs and other softer means to get to a point where people can believe death. so i think those are the goals. it is a battle of ideas. but if it's a battle of ideas, it's going to take a long time to wip. but i do think that in public diplomacy we sometimes forget the importance of that ideological struggle, which may be the most important of all. >> i think i would do it somewhat differently but you've heard me say earlier that i believe quite passionately that public diplomacy is there to ensure that everything we do that we achieve our foreign policy goals and objectives which frankly vary country to country region to roinl. and so in some parts of the world some of the struggles we've been talking about are higher than they are in others but that frankly what we were trying to do is to be sure that public diplomacy was closely aligned with the policy side of our
interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say about because we went to bosnia and not because they were a threat to the united states of america but because muslims were being slaughtered. we went in because we could stop it. the same thing with kosovo. we regretted -- president clinton said his deepest regret "that we did not stop the slaughter of 800,000 people in rwanda. also, that did. the question how quickly we could have intervened effectively in rwanda. the strong caveat to that is we cannot right every wrong. we cannot put out every fire. we cannot intervene even though there is a compelling humanitarian interest. where we can, we should. it is in our interest to see countries develop and have a chance for democracy and the things we have all stood for, certainly in our country, for well over 200 years. the decision has to be made by policy makers for our interests and our values, where possible, but also you have to have the support of the american people. otherwise, like the war in vietnam, you leave in disarray because the american people lost confi
was starving playwrights and a minor league diplomat during the day, working in such places as bosnia and iraq, but there was proof that there was a possibility in my son costa agneses. most of the parents might have resorted to praying that the child could have a future. thanks to my analysis and -- diagnosis, i had the advantage of evidence based conviction, not hope. self-esteem was the most formative factor in all of that. granted, i am at one end of the spectrum, and i and a stand that too many parents that will seem like the possible and not the probable. i would never invalidated the prognosis for me was once not so good, nor the my behaviors have not dramatically changed for the better. what is considered probable has changed immensely over the last 10 years. that is a credit to everybody working in the autism world. self-esteem is one of the most predominant qualities it got me to that point. unlike other people on the spectrum who are brilliant, i do not have that kind of brain. lastly, it is an ethical mistake whenever we sacrifice the possible in the name of the probable. as nation
of the lieutenant colonels here. the general's aid in bosnia? he was his aide during the invasion of iraq. harry was back in afghanistan -- and here he was back in afghanistan. it was the first time -- petraeus has a special relationship with the 101st because he commanded them in the invasion of iraq. it was his first combat command. it so happened that the 101st was in afghanistan, deployed together for the first time since 2003. and david was one of t three combat leaders, italian leaders we write about. and it is cool that he is here. doug oliphant was the senior adviser. doug was also has kind of special relation to petraeus. he was the planner of the surge in iraq in 2007 when he was with the first cavalry division. it is great that they are here. i think if you read the book, you will enjoy that interplay between the dominant character, petraeus, and the secondary characters who are very different and interested and very tough battles throughout the year. it really is a brutal war. writing about them from my vantage point was interesting and inspiring to me to see the kind of lives they l
. how do you deal with that? say no. that's not true. we were in bosnia. we were in kuwait. we got 2,000 mosques. we're not going destroy islam. i don't think that's very effective, quite frankly. i think a better approach is an approach which combines the kind of things we do with exchange programs and other kind of softer means. public diplomacy 2.07 to get to a point where people can believe that. it's a pernicious belief. people can believe it. it doesn't mean they will kill us. i think those are the goals. it is a battle of ideas, but if it's a battle of ideas, it's going to take a long time to win. i think in public diplomacy we sometimes forget the importance of that ideological struggle. which may be the most important of all. >> i think i would somewhat differently. but you heard me say earlier that i believe quite passionately that public zip sei is there to -- diplomacy is there to ensure and everything we do to achieve our foreign policy goals and objective that vary from country to country and region to region. in some parts of the world, some of the struggles you've bee
going forward? many syrians have begun to compare their situation to that of bosnia. it took the international community a long time to intervene. i think it was more about shamed into a situation when in a population of 5 million when you have 200,000 being at that we cleansed, that puts the international community in a very difficult position. we have a civilian population and regime that is waging of full-scale war. you have a population that has tried to defend itself with increasingly bigger arms. they're bringing with them arms. we have better representatives of the free syrian army. some of them confided in us but perhaps they do not even need to be armed. that the arms supply is coming from within. i think that it is a security threat not just for neighboring countries but the civilian population that is becoming increasingly caught between sides that are fighting. and now the free syrian army is no longer doing the defense job because now they want to create some sort of strategic plan in which the cut the supplies off the regime forces. they're taking over certain a
as it is for cosimo or bosnia. the first of july, croatia will join the european union. it is absolutely impossible to say no to the other former countries of the former republic of yugoslavia. this is not only a question of readability, it is historically impossible to exclude these countries from the european union. bafta stick to the promises they made to fulfill the criteria of copenhagen. i must admit i am reluctant to say that development is going in the european direction. i have another feeling. the european union, concerning kosovo, nevertheless, there are five member states of the european union not recognizing kosovo. five of the member states -- you see how difficult our political system is and how much reforms are needed. how to move europe away from austerity. if i would be it social democratic politician, i could make a wise speech. i must be more reluctant with my wise speeches. >> come back, we will look forward to that. [laughter] we offer asylum. >> i think more and more governments understand that one- sided austerity measures, economic recovery is impossible and growth cannot r
sentencing singing verses from the koran and insisted on his innocence. is he an american citizen from bosnia. alli? >> is he the face of the fast pitch softball after winning two olympic medals she is arguably the biggest star in the sport. joining us now is jenny fench. welcome rumor has it you are seven months pregnant but i don't believe that. >> i promise, she is there she makes herself evidence and known daily. >> that's great. you refer to her as she. you have two young sons, of course, but you know this time you are having a daughter. and i read that you think that there are different responsibilities and sort of different values that come with having a daughter definitely, i'm trying to become more aware. i have two older brothers. so i luckily was bought up in the tom boy. helped me athletically first softball player. excited. definitely some worries. one of the biggest ones is how soft my husband is going to be with her and how he already has fingers wrapped around. it will be fun. we are looking forward to it. >> of course of course, obviously you believe in sports for young girls
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